Killearn Hospital

 

Killearn Hospital was one of five commisioned in 1938 in preparation for the war. Building started in 1939 and also complete in 1941 in time for the air raids on Clydebank and other Clydeside towns, which could be seen and heard in Killearn.

Local people had been asked to assist in getting the hospital ready to meet the emergency. As well as air raid casualties it was used for treatment of sick and wounded servicemen, injured seamen from convoys arriving in the Clyde, essential war workers, pensioners and Prisoners-of-War. It played an important part in the Clyde Valley Scheme for urgent treatment and care of war workers and was also used for emergency cases from the surrounding population.

The hospital had close links with Glasgow Western Infirmary but had several special units of its own. The orthopaedic and neurosurgical units were famous throughout Scotland, the latter being transferred to the Southern General Hospital.

The hospital was desgined to provide 640 emergeny beds, but after the War its total bed complement was 404.

The distance from Glasgow casued problems with the transportation of emergency cases and of visitors and nursing staff.

The hospital was eventually abandoned in the early 1970′s.

Also see Killearn Hospital images on Flickr.

  73 Responses to “Killearn Hospital”

  1. My mother, Mary (Clark) Ray, worked in this hospital during WWII as an Occupational Therapist. She was brought over from Canada, and asked to help set up an OT department. However, when she arrived, the superintendent of the hospital didn’t think OT was very valuable and made the establishment of OT services very difficult initially. However, Mom was successful enough he began to appreciate the value and by the time she left to come back to Canada, he admitted she would be sorely missed.

    The Ontario Society of Occupational Therapy is gathering things for their archives so if anyone can share some information that would add to the stories of OT’s making a difference for rehabilitating people, I would be delighted.

  2. My mum worked there with sick kids before it went to Ruchill, about 1967. she didnt really enjoy it there but went to Ruchill which she loved

  3. I trained as an orhopaedic nurse in killearn hospital from 1968-1970 & those were very happy times.It is heartbreaking to see the place in ruins now.I have so many great memories from there.It was such a friendly enviroment.Too bad it had to close.

    • never say goodbye

      • Hi Stan the scan!I never did say goodbye.Killearn will always be in my heart & all the great people I met there!

        • tell me Gabrielle what are you up to last I heard you were in Canada. Every time I think of the old scan room it is with nothing but affection. Every time the old memory cells construct a picture of you you have a smile on your face, and that can be nothing but good. I am now living in Australia which is a good place for a wobbly to grow old disgracefully

          • Well Stan,I’m still in Canada & still smiling but with a few wrinkles.My youngest daughter was out in Australia for a year,Melbourne &then Sydney,she returned here last August reluctantly.Where in OZ are you?
            We had a wee bit of a reunion in September at Killearn with some of the folk we trained with & it was really nice to get together but very sad to see the hospital in ruins.
            lovely to hear from & do keep in touch.
            Gabrielle

  4. I was a patient at Killearn Hospital around 1967/8, I was in for a brain tumour, I remember the smell of the place and the nurses especially one nurse who I called auntie buntie, I was in hospital for a long time and I was always allowed to visit the female patients and they would let me have a drink of coffee. The gardens where beautiful and I can remember rabbits running about. If it wasnt for the staff at Killearn I wouldnt be here today

  5. My mother was a patient in ward 1 at Killearn, nursed by Staff Nurse Ward and her team. I later trained there as a nurse and especially remember Sister Cronin who kept me on the straight and narrow. Such a shame to see what has happened, it was absolutely beautiful grounds and so peaceful.

    • Just been reading the comments about Killearn Hospital.I was brought up along from there at the sawmill and remember seeing all the buses at weekends taking all the visitors to the hospital.Also when we got on the bus for school there were never any seats for us until the bus emptied at the hospital with all the staff going to work.When the hospital closed the buses stopped going round that way.It is indeed very sad to see the place in such a state.Miss Ward lived in the village with her sister until a few years ago and they are now both deceased.

      • HI nancy, my nana lived up the road by the saw mill, her name is Kathleen Russell aka Kathy, she passed away 6 years ago, if you new her is there anything you could tell me about her, i obviously know an awful lot but its nice to find out from others to, and pictures if you have any, she also worked at the hospital as a nurse, i have a staff pic of her and her colleagues i could scan it on.

    • Ah ! Sr Cronin ! She was a guiding ightning for me. Matt Rodgers. Started my lifelong nursing career there in 1965 .

  6. I grew up at the Blane Smiddy and can remember Killearn Hospital in its heyday, I remember as a wee boy delivering the News papers to the Wards, getting autographs from all the football players that were having cartilage operations, helping my Mum & Dad fill up the vending machines, I can also remember the nurses returning from the The Black Bull and Knocking on the shop door at 11pm looking for cigarettes discussing with each other on how to get back in without the Matron catching them.
    Just remember don’t just blame the asbestos for the way the hospital is now, when it closed there was allot of interest in redeveloping it but the do gooders kept on rejecting the numerous plans that were put forward.

    • Anne,are you Rachel,s daughter? I was very friendly with her until she passed away. I did not
      realise you had done EN training at Killearn,obviouslt many years after I trained in orthpaedics
      there. Would like to hear from you again. I still live in the same place. I tried to phone you,
      but there is no response to the number I have.

  7. I remember Killearn Hospital very well, My mother was a patient in there, I think around 1966, for Asthma. I was at school in Killearn and stayed out near Croftamie, and remember you too Duncan Goodwin! (you were in my class at school)
    Killearn Hospital was set in beautiful gardens, it is such a shame to see the place go from rack to ruin, the site should be cleared and perhaps another hospital built in the grounds, it is such a peaceful setting

  8. my gran Margaret Brown (cairns. worked in kllearn for years as an auxillary nurse. she had always dreamed of becomng a nurse but her mother would not let her as she was requred to bring home money for the family. she talked fondly of her time at killearn

  9. I remember the hospital very well as I lived at Crosshead Roadin the village. I used to work at weekends in the farm across the road from the hospital, collecting the cattle and driving them to the farm, also watching the helicopters arriving with the injured from the Cairngorms and surrounding areas.

  10. Can someone please give me the postcode for Killearn Hospital or the nearest possible postcode as would like to visit

    • Killearn, Glasgow, G63 9PT

      thats the postcode for oakwood nursery and cafe, the hospital is just over the road from there and your best bet would be to park in there car park and walk over to the side of the road that the hospital is on.

  11. I was a spinal injury patient at Killearn Hospital 1964 under the care of consultant Mr Shorstein for whom I have a great deal praise, he spoke to you the patient not as was common in those days to discuss your proposed treatment with everyone around your bed space, totally ignoring the person in the bed. His expertise gave me the ability to walk again, but warned me I may suffer associated problems later in life which has happened.
    A few years ago returning north by train from London Euston I was joined at the seats opposite by a Father and Son from Glasgow who had spent the day at the House of Commons / Lords. I mentioned during my service in the Royal Navy at Faslane I spent some time at Killearn with a spinal injury. I mentioned the Consultant by name, the father replied his mother was treated by the same person at Killearn around the same time, his mother always said he had saved her life. That day on the train was the first time both they and I had heard the name Shorstein by someone outside their family. I do not remember the ward number, memory loss is a problem, but I have just recalled a nurse by the name of Port thank you for your care should you by chance read this comment.

    • Joe Shorstein was not just a great medical professional but a philosopher. Sadly, he seemed to have lived a very tortured inner life, as described by R.D.Laing (who worked at the hospital in the late 50′s) in his autobiography. May he RIP.

  12. My mom came from Germany in 1949 and worked as a nurses aide at Killearn Hospital. I remember her telling me stories of going to dances on her days off with her girlfriends. They had to walk quite a long way from the hospital before catching a bus.
    She met my dad at one of those dances…just 2 weeks after arriving in Scotland. She had fond memories of the place, as it was the beginning to a very happy marriage!

  13. I spent a very happy 5years at killearn Hospital and would be delighted to hear from anyone who was there between 1967-1972

    • Hi Elaine,I remember you.If I’m correct you were an enrolled nurse.I have just been in contact with Noreen Devenney,actually I stayed with her when I was home in Ireland.I’m now living in Canada.Would love to hear from you.

    • I was an orthopaedic student nurse at Killearn Hospital I started PTS in September 1967 and would love to hear from anyone who was there with me I was Hazel McVean then.

      • I was there when you were there(elaine McCartney) you will also find Noreen,cathy &Gabrielle on this site.We had a reunion in Killearn last year which was a wonderful catch-up.Love to hear from you do you remember Pat Harkness and Sheena Ross and loads more?

  14. Hi Elaine,I remember you from Killearn.You were an enrolled Nurse there.I met up with Noreen Devenney in the summer & she hasn’t changed!I’m living in Canada & I would love to hear from you.

    • Hi Gabrielle, It was lovely to hear from you.Where abouts in Canada do you live? Ian and I lived in Calgary for years and now our daughter and grandson live in Burlington Ontario in fact we spent Xmas with them. We came back to U.K. in2005 and settled in Somerset,but spend our holidays flying back and forth to Canada. How is Norren does she live in Canada? I often think it would be lovely to keep in touch with people so if you have time it would be lovely to keep in touch and give me all your news

  15. Hi Elaine,thanks for responding. Noreen is back living in Ireland.She had lived in England for a while.I live in Winnipeg & have been here for 36 years….where has the time gone?So sad to what has happened to Killearn Hosp.I think those were the two happiest years of my whole nursing career.My email address is gabymcgrath@hotmail.com.Have you been in contact with anyone else from the old days?look forward to hearing from you.

    • Hi Gabrielle,I was delighted to hear from you.My e-mail address is-elaine.ritchie@btinternet.com Thanks for yours and I have pit it into my contacts and will keep in touch that way as it is not too easy getting into this site either that or Iam not too clever with the computer!! I do not have any contact with anyone from the hospital but I did register with friends re united and there are a few onthe site i.e. Hazel mc Vean,Rosemary Devine,and I think Eddie Manderson-he married Sheila mcFarlane so it is a good contact site-do you remember any of them? It will be great to reminise with you and see how much we both remember. Noreen was at my wedding 41 years ago.I wonder if she remembers? Does she have an e-mail as it would be nice to chat to her also. I have worked in hospitals in Canada and here and none of them matched Killearn ,I now work in an Endoscopy unit 2days a week its o.k. it pays the flight to Ontario twice a year!I went back to college and did my r.n.course as they faced out the Enrolled nurses here(cheek) but I am now semi-retired you are right time flies. Iwill go now but will talk to you soon.

  16. Hi Elaine,I tried your email address but it didn’t work.Please send again.
    Gabrielle

  17. Hello Gabriell & Elaine
    Great to be catching up with more old friends. Thanks for the call today Gabrielle, I’m looking forward to catching up with you now Elaine. Gabrielle will give you my email address. Of course I remember your wedding, I remember your husband is called Ian Ritchie (hope I am right) would love to see some of the pictures, have you still got any. I thought you had went to Australia, I was surprised when Gabrielle said you went to Canada.
    In my head Killearn was the best time of my life. Did not always think so at the time. ha ha But it sure is a great time to look back on. We had some laughs along the way. Wouldn’t it be great if we were able to make contact with more people from our time in Killearn and have a reunion. I’d love that.

  18. My great gran margaret brown (cairns) worked there it looks terrible but didnt used to would love to visit it now but prob aspesdos in the wall

  19. I trained in orthopaedics at Killearn qualifying with honours in 1957 thanks to our
    wonderful tutor Jenny R. I went on to gain further qulifications,to marry and have
    children and continue in a long career in nursing. Killearn was the best of all, I think
    because of the close sense of community which prevailed there helped by the relative
    isolation. The hospital site is a mess now,with trees growing out of the wards,and a
    couple of herds of evileyed belligerent goats roaming around,the billies looking for
    a fight and making it impossible to get one’s bearings.It occurred to me that at almost
    80 I could not climb out of the Home windows now, even if I could find it in the
    current moonscape. I should be very interested if anyone out there has any knowledge
    of supernatural incidents in ward one. I experienced this on night duty on this ward
    and would be keen to learn of other experiences. This manifestation is still going on
    and is well known to tocal people.

    • Mary
      It is a while since I left a comment about my time in Killearn Hospital the comments from your former staff colleagues proves your point there was a great community spirit at Killearn.
      Which made for quality care for the patients.
      I was in the end ward turning right at the ambulance delivery door down the passage the ward was on the left thinking back I do not recall ever knowing the ward number.
      Your comment about climbing out of the home window gave me a real good laugh just the tonic I needed.

  20. Nice to hear from you Malcolm. Glad you got a laugh out of my comment about climbing out of the Home windows -you would get an even bigger laugh if I tried it now! It was an essentially more innocent
    time and the student nurses used to go up to the dancing at Killearn Kirk,sometimes enjoying things
    so much that they often stayed until the end of the dance at 10pm, which made it impossible to get back to the hospital before locking up time,but we provided for this eventuality by leaving the windows
    of our rooms on the latch so that we could climb back in. We often referred to the Home as “Stalag Luft”because of all the restrictive rules,not realising that the matron was in loco parentis and that
    we must have caused her many a grey hair.The nursing standards were second to none and they are
    with me yet – I shall remain a Killearn nurse until I shuffle off this mortal coil. I have photographs of my
    time there, and first my children and now my grandchildren fallabout laughing at the uniforms.
    Regards, Mary

    t

    • Mary the comment you make about the high standard of care at Killearn, in my case the nursing care was excellent.
      Matron was once a nurse possibly pre NHS, she knew who was who and turning a little blind eye to your late return, you gave a little extra to the patient making everyone happy.
      The reason I laughed was two fold (1) thinking of you scrambling through the open window shoes in hand making as little noise as possible and thinking you had got one over on Matron.I would hope today you are able to stay out past 10.00pm and you have a front door key.
      (2) When I thought my recovery was almost 100% I made an attempt to go to the village instead of going through the front door, I thought the best escape route was walk on the grass next to the ward to the wall along side the road how misguided, I managed to sit on the wall but my attempt to get one leg on and over the wall resulted in the most tremendous pain leaving me stranded on the top of the wall fearing the next strike of unbearable pain should I attempt to move.
      I was rescued by a Postman.
      I have been told a good laugh works wonders.
      Do you remember Mr Shorestein ?
      Regards
      Malcolm

      • Malcolm – I most certainly do remember Mr Schorstein, or “Joe” as he was known to his many friends and colleagues at Killearn. In collaboration with his fellow senior consultant Mr Sloan Robertson he built up an international reputation for clinical excellence for the neuro unit in the field of neurosurgery,and the orthopaedic high-flyers established a similar international standing for the hospital in orthopaedics. Over time, a “chair” was established in orthopaedic s at Glasgow University, the first professorship being awarded to Roland Barnes of Killearn. A professorship in neurological sciences took a bit longer, too late I think for the two gentlemen who had done so much wonderful work although I believe they were both awarded honours for their services to medicine. The first professorship was awarded to an “incomer” There is a bronze bust of MrSloan Robertson in the foyer of the Institute of Neurological Sciences in Glasgow – I do not know if Mr Schorstein is similarly honoured somewhere
        I have found some interesting stuff about Killearn on my wanderings around the net. There is mention of a book “Silent Heroes” by John Miller which includes an account of the experiences of a nurse who worked there during the war years. Your local library will be able to reserve a copy for you if you are interested – I have a reservatiion at our local branch which I will pick up tomorrow. There is also an interesting and amusing account of
        the experieces of a young English boy who sustained what appears to have been a peripheral nerve injury after an argument with a land mine, who found himself ultimately as a patient in Killearn.. He describes the “serene beauty” of the surrounding countryside,which was also a factor to those who were treated there or who worked there
        He seems to have enjoyed himself playing cards and popping out to the local hostelry- where were you off to,Malcolm,when you were making your escape? Killearn always did have an understanding attitude to patients who were able to get about and a sympathetic eye was always extended if anyone returned to the ward five sheets to the wind. The name of the latter book is, I think, MY WAR, by Douglas Vass. Just keep on clicking on the links at the bottom of the Killearn site and something usually turns up! There is one post which has what appears to be a photograph of part of the orthopaedic unit with Dumgoyne in the background and features some of the beautiful gardens
        Yes, Malcolm I do now have a front door key but it is not half as much fun as climbing in and out of the windows
        Cheers, and lang may your lum reek!

        Mary

        2

        • It is surreal to read of Mr Schorstein, without whom, together with his team (including Mr Sloan Robertson I think) I almost certainly would not be here to write this now. Does anyone know what happened to him, and if there is any surviving family?

          • S King try entering into your search engine Joseph Schorstein – R.D. LAING,S RABBI good luck. I have been trying to pass this information to you for siome time but could not get the site to work

          • Dear Mary, do you know if there are any surviving family of the Schorsteins? I heard there had been some tragedy, but I would love to be able to pass on my respects.

            Sheena

  21. My mum & dad, Kitty (nee Gibson) & Alex Knox, met in Killearn Hospital where they both worked in the 1950′s-70′s when it closed. My dad worked in the Neuro theatre & my mum worked in the kitchens initially & was then an auxillary nurse. My Gran, Winnie Gibson also worked there.

    My family paid a visit to Killearn today & drove past the old hospital & reminisced about the good old days. Sad to see it in the state it’s in today but glad to be able to show my kids where it all began!

  22. Does anyone recollect an auxillary Nurse called Elizabeth Tyronney from Inverness. She worked there (I believe it would have been in the 1950′s sometime) until she married my Dad in 1959. She sadly passed away last October but used to fondly remember her time there and all the people and things they used to get up to. Please let me know if anyone can recall her.

  23. Hi my name is Sydney Brown from Killearn village and started working at the great hospital as an orthotic technician,then when it moved to Gartnavel hosp I became an Orthotist and have lived down in Harrogate for over 30 years ,and do miss my village so much ,but always get up to killearn 3 to 4 times a year.Nice to meet all my village pals who we went to school with.My mum Rose Brown worked at our hospital to and she is still in village.God Bless you all and a merry christmas.
    xx Syd Brown.

  24. My Dad, David W Knowles, had a cerebral haemorrhage around 1967 (aged 40 – when I was about 5 years old) and had his life saved by the excellent surgeons at Killearn Hospital, a long trip by ambulance from Johnstone, Renfrewshire, where I still live. My Mum told me that she fainted when told that he would be blind, but he was lucky for his sight to be spared. He recuperated at Hawkhead Hospital in Paisley. He lived another 25 years, taken by cancer in 1992. My niece now lives in Balfron with her fiance.

  25. I started my nursing career in Killearn Jan 1965 .When I left I took with me a young lady by the name of Anne Mitchell We married in1967 and there we remain . During my afterlife from Killearn I actually nursed Mr Shorstien at trhe time of his death . Incidentally , I visited the Hospital 24 Feb 2013 and took some photos .Be nice to hear from those who trained there around 1965

  26. I myself was a patient in Killearn Hospital in 1966. I had TB and an abcess in my lower back, after being in full length plaster for a month then an operation to remove 2 ribs I was we’ll on my way to a full recovery, thanks to the nurses and doctors, one was Staff nurse Williamson,then made up to be a sister. Another nurse I remember was nurse Campbell who was also very kind as they all were and were always smiling.
    The young lad who was in the bed next to me was a lad called William Alexander, who’s girlfriend if I remember rightly was killed in a motorbike accident in which he lost an arm. Even although I was feeling very poorly it was the staff,as they were absolutely brilliant no matter what,day or night,so please give yourselves a big pat on the back for anyone who worked there. Thank you all so very much.

  27. Thank you for your kind recognition of the nurses at that time .It is nice to know we contributed to the recovery of our patients . Incidentally ,the Nurse Campbell would be Wilma who was and is a close friend of ours to this day .

    • You all deserve recognition for the fantastic work you all did and I do know that as a patient we all had a moan from time to time but as ever you all took it in your stride. Please say hello to Wilma Campbell from me and I do remember she smiled with her eyes and she lit up the ward as soon as she entered it. My fondest regards to you all.

    • as a 10 year old patient at Killearn about 1970 due to a hand injury I remember a nurse with blonde hair called nurse lennon who was great and I think my doctor was called Dr Parks

      • my email address was incorrect

      • Nurse Lennon was Mary Lennon a student nurse at that time. Mary qualified in orthopaedic nursing and went on to train in general nursing afterwards. I believe I was in the same class as Mary 1969 /1971 loved every minute I was there great place great people .

  28. Is this place still standing?

  29. most certainly still standing. Most of the wards accommodation blocks and theatres there . feb 2013. .. 15and. 16 missing.

  30. I remember Killearn hospital from visiting my father{ Peter} every Sunday during the summer holidays in the mid sixties. He was eventually diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis wh
    ile he was there. It took most of the day to visit from where we lived in Moffat and, only being 6 or 7, hated the journey. I do remember being made a fuss of by the staff as very few children were encouraged to visit these large nissen type wards, I also remember taking walks in the lovely grounds which surrounded them. Really would like to see the place regenerated

  31. Hi,
    I was a in-patient at Killearn in Spring to Summer of 1963 due to a spinal abcess. Dr Schorstein was an amazing surgeon who showed much care for all his patients. I was in a plaster cast for the time that I was at Killearn but was wheeled out into the sunshine which improved all our spirits. My family could only visit occasionally so it was great that it was such a friendly atmosphere.
    May Armstrong

  32. Does anyone remember a mary mckenzie that worked in killearn hospital

  33. I was an 8yr old boy admitted to Killearn Hospital spring 1945 ,I sustained a right wrist
    Injury that severed the arteries & tendons.
    I was there about 4 months, I was the only kid in my ward with all the service men , my Doctor
    Was a Dr. Parks. I would dearly love to see a photo of this man who saved my right hand .
    I remember a high hedge , I think down by the main Rd that I called my Spitfire .
    I also remember that patients and nurses would go for ‘walks’ I was along as lookout !
    Which was rewarded with candy.
    So many memory’s forgotten till I stumbled on this site, hope someone replys to this,
    Sincerely, John (Ian) Angus Brown

  34. your consultant surgeon was Athol Ross Parkes; he was an extremely tall,charming man who always wore a bow tie. He must have been quite young when you were his patient as it is on record that he and his fellow surgeons came to work to establish what eventually became an international centre of excellence in orthopaedics and peripheral nerve surgery in the west of Glasgow after returning from war service. I remember working with him in theatres, and he always went the extra mile to obtain the best outcome for his patients. May he rest in peace – there are many who will remember him with affection and gratitude

    Mary Maltman

  35. I remember being rushed to the hospital with an acute appendix in a taxi.It was 1947 and I was eight years old. My father , Martin Nichols ,was one of the neurosurgical team then. In the RAMC,he had been released from a POW camp at the end of the war and found work at Killearn with Sloan Robertson from 1946 to 1948 .After that he went to Aberdeen to develop the new neurosurgical unit there.
    We rented a house on Station Road–Benview, I think it was called, and I would walk to school ( the old school!) up a narrow path between two fields. Lovely!
    Judy Cameron

  36. I was a student at Killearn from September 1967 and I have really fond memories of my time there.I remember nursing the patients in their Plaster beds on the verandahs and..I also remember a Sister Dallas on the childrens’ward and James Tulloch Brown a Consultant,can’t remember the Prof’s name but his registrar was Mr Woods.Happy days.

  37. Hi Hazel,I remember you and There are a few of us on this site that were all there with us.We had a reunion 2years ago we all had got older but it was the same family atmosphere that we had all those years ago.

  38. Hi Hazel,I remember you and There are a few of us on this site that were all there with us.We had a reunion 2years ago we all had got older but it was the same family atmosphere that we had all those years ago.

  39. I was seconded from the western infirmary as a student nurse for Paediatrics experience in 1962. For some reason we could not be accommodated at Yorkhill. Since it was out of the way, parents could not visit daily. I remember a 3 year old with Spina Bifida whose mother told him ( at the end of visiting time) that she was just going to the toilet, but she never came back; her way of saying goodbye without upsetting the wee lad.. He kept his eyes on the door every waiting moment for days. Heartbreak for us all, but how do you rationalize with a 3 year old?!

  40. Actually, Morag.

  41. My late father, George Thompson (dob August 1929) was a patient at Killearn as a young man. He had a tubercular infection in his hip and spent long periods (perhaps recurring) at Killearn, I think in the late 40′s-50′s and possibly early 60′s. He had previously been a patient as a very young child at Mearnskirk and was evacuated to Millport during WW2. I realise that it’s unlikely that there will be many surviving patients or staff of his vintage still alive, but I would love to know more about Killearn during these periods. My Father was oddly very happy at Killearn and spoke with great affection of the WW2 vetrans who helped “educate” him and make up for the gaps in his education that had occurred due to his illness. And also of the nursing staff and doctors who cared so brilliantly for the patients. I think he had fun at Killearn, although the administration of streptomycin straight into his hip joint didn’t sound fun at all. When he died, he asked for his ashes to be scattered on Dumgoyne, close to Killearn. If anyone does have any memories or information about the hospital or my Dad’s during his time there, I would love to hear from them. His doctor may have been Dr Sloan???? Thank you, Laura Thompson.

  42. I was in Killearn Hospital for about three weeks when I was 14. I had been suffering from petit mal seizures. I think it was in January 1964 because outside it was bitterly cold, but inside lovely and warm. Along with EEGs, I had an exploratory operation where (under local anaesthetic) I had a hole drilled in the side of my head to allow some sort of gas to be pumped in and X-rays taken – I think to observe the absorption rate to differentiate between normal and tumourous cells? Anyway I was told during the op. that he (the surgeon) would now use a brace and bit for the drilling and as it was just above my ear I could hear the grinding and the bone chips falling. I couldn’t stop laughing because all I could think was “this man’s drilling a hole in the side of my head” which just seemed so surreal :). I remember also that I was allowed to smoke! Apparently, I found out long afterwards, that they had originally thought it was an aggressive tumour, and that the son of similar age to me of people my parents knew had had one and died within three months. They knew I smoked and asked special permission. The staff were all so kind and caring.

  43. After reading through all the comments again, I know recall that the neurologist who got me admitted to the hospital was Dr Gaylor and the surgeon who led the operations was Mr Sloan Robertson.

  44. The photos on this site and Flikr bring back poignant memories – many thanks.

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>